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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)
believe how it ended. here's josh mankowitz. >> sheila's phone rang. >> they said there had been an accident. >> an accident involving sheila's good friend, roommate, and fellow student. angela samota. >> i initially thought angie had been in a car accident. i went through the is she in the hospital, where is she. and i wasn't getting any information from her. and my girlfriend was crying. >> that's because it wasn't an accident. that same morning, angie's sorority sister evelyn sandy was given the news straight out. >> they told me that angie had been murdered. she had been found naked with a lot of stab wounds. it was absolute shock. >> angie samota had not only been killed, but butchered. repeatedly stabbed in her own bedroom. it was a bloody end to a life that had so much promise. >> she was the most amazing person. she was full of life. she could light up a room. she was a very hard worker. and she knew where she was going. she was very, very driven. >> angie had grown up in amarillo, texas, and attended the all girls hockaday school in dallas. she just bought a condo near t
during the financial crisis. my conversation with former fdic chair sheila bair and the story she couldn't tell while she was on the job. >> so many lives are lost every day because of lack of access to clean drinking water. >> the remarkable partnership between a renowned inventor and corporate america that could save untold lives. it's the real thing. the "wall street journal report" begins right now. >> this is america's number one financial news program, "wall street journal report." now maria bartiromo. >> here's a look at what is making news as we head to a new week on wall street. disappointing news on the broadest measure of the size and strength of the economy in america. the reading of the gross domestic product shows the economy grew at a rate of 1 1/3 percent for the quarter down the previous reading of 1.7%. much of the change due to poor farm production in the midwest because of a severe drought. the dow jones industrial average broke a four-day losing streak on thursday with the best day in two weeks after fresh concerns about europe eased. the markets were down, however,
that sheila bare discusses in her new pull-no-punches book "bull by the horns," writing and i quote . . . she joins me now. sheila thank you for coming in and writing this tell-all book that is fascinating. because you are the first person to talk about this from inside the room. and that's what makes it so different. >> it does. and i think given the fact there was so much taxpayer exposure is here that the public deserved to know what was going on. >> eliot: why do you think it happened -- it being this cataclysm that brought us all down? >> well it's a typically cycle, we were having a housing asset build, and people said well this is different this time. housing will be good forever. we'll make loose loans and they can always refinance. and then they were taking more leverage. so they were using other people's money to make these bets. there is the [ inaudible ] capital accord that was specifically allowed large financial institutions to take on more capital. and the fdic fought that tooth and nail -- >> eliot: you were throughout this cycle, it was leverage
overdone? hear what a former top regulator says about the rescue. former fdic chairman sheila bair joins us. and if american airlines and its pilots strike a deal tomorrow, it could mean fewer delays for customers and the company's bankruptcy. that and more tonight on nbr! captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: some encouraging news tonight for the housing market and consumer confidence. first, housing-- a measurement of prices in 20 cities across the country rose four tenths of a percent in july. that's the sixth straight month of gains for the s&p case- shiller home price index. and consumer's are feeling more optimistic. the conference board's confidence index rose to 70.3 in september, marking its highest level since february. these two groups, consumers and housing, are significant because of their influence over the entire economy. >> with the improvement in consumer confidence, we think that consumer spending could pick up as we go into next year. especially since the housing market is showing signs of life and moem prices are starting to firm up. but the encouraging data didn't help s
postal service continues. dagen: and former chief of the fdic sheila baer to tell you what's wrong with your banks how to fix it. connell: new book out, some controversy there, we will talk to her about it. at the top of the hour let's talk to nicole petallides right now and every 15 minutes with stocks now. looking at a big merger today. nicole: that's right. focus on the merger in the mattresses business. everybody knows sealy and everybody knows tempurpedic. these are getting together. you have tempurpedic agreeing to acquire the rival sealy at a 2.8% premium and combines the two companies, they are just more highly leveraged in order to be able to combine their strong assets. they will though still operate separately in many ways, so we'll continue to follow but temper-pedic. look at that. back to you. connell: nicole thank you. dagen: take a look at this. the u.s. economy growing at a very weak 1.3% in the second quarter, revised down from 1.7%. that is, well, lousy. connell: deputy editor at the "wall street journal"'s editorial page is here to tell us it's always the economy
your back. sheila baer's job was to deal with banks. neil's job was to be a watchdog over t.a.r.p. he wrote a book called "bailout." investigating wa investigating. to say things are just as bad now as they were then is just wrong. >> if you're an executive looking at losing your job and your bonuses, certainly when they were how they were in 2010 as they were in 2008. if you're someone who is now enjoying their 99th week of unemployment, you may differ with the fact that you're necessarily better off. certainly overall, we have a much more stable economy and things are hopefully on the upswing, but there is a lot of people who are unnecessarily left behind. >> sheila, your new book is called "bull by the horns. fighting to save main street from wall street and wall street from itself." the title of your two books have a similar theme to them. both of you think chicago and washington haven't done enough in four years ago. what do we have to do to ensure there's not this fight between main street and wall street. >> i think wall street has to be different than -- if you view what's ver
sheila bear rereveals what happs and she tells us why it could still happen again. woman 1: this isn't just another election. we're voting for... the future of our medicare and social security. man 1: i want facts. straight talk. tell me your plan... and what it means for me. woman 2: i'm tired of the negative ads and political spin. that won't help me decide. man 2: i earned my medicare and social security. and i deserve some answers. anncr: where do the candidates stand on issues that... affect seniors today and in the future? find out with the aarp voters' guide at earnedasay.org we create easy-to-use, powerful trading tools for all. look at these streaming charts! they're totally customizable and they let you visualize what might happen next. that's genius! we knew you needed a platform that could really help you elevate your trading. so we built it. chances of making this? it's a lot easier to find out if a trade is potentially profitable. just use our trade & probability calculator and there it is. for all the reasons you trade options - from income to risk management to dive
the benjamins, former chairman sheila bear rereveals what happs and she tells ushy it could stilhappen a. woman 1: this isn't just another election. e're voting for... the futuref our medicare and soal security. man i wt fas. raig . murn. and what it means for me. woman 2: i'm tired of the negative ads and political spin. that won't help me decide. man 2: i earned my medicare and. and i deserve some awers. anncr: wre do the candidates stand on issues that... affect sio tod andn th fu? find out with the aarp voters' guide at earnedasay.org we create easy-to-use, powerful trading tools for all. look at these streaming charts! they're totally customizable and they let you visualize what mightappen next. that's gens! we kneyouneed a platform that could really help you elevate your trading. so we built it. chances of making this? it's a lot easier to find out if a trade is potentially profitable. ju use our trade & probability calculator and there it is. for all the reasons u trade optis - ie isnant ivfion you'll have the tools to get it done. strategies. chains. positions. we put 'em all on one
helped save citigroup. sheila bair was among those making the decisions. she was the chairman of the fdic and has written about the financial crisis in a new book, "bull by the horns. " she join us tonight from the nasdaq. sheila, congratulations on the book. quite a read to relive those days and months four years ago. after all the billions of dollars spent and the millions of homes foreclosed on, you wrote, i wonder if we overreacted. you say the generosity of the response troubles you, why? >> the generosity of the banks. we clearly needed to do something. weeshtd have done more to get the homeowners restructured and clean up the banks balance sheet, by making tm clean up the losss and clean up the balance sheets, especially sick ones like citigroup. so some areas we didn't do enough, in banks we were lavish in the aim of mony and support we gave them. >> tom: do you regret that? >> well, i do. a lot of this is retrospective. you look back on this, and most of them only had a quarter loss, and paid by the end of 2009, and i think, you know, it troubles me, the narrative of the bailouts
's even testified before congress. or, ask sheila white, who grew up in the bronx, fleeing an abusive home, she fell in with a guy who said he would protect her. he sold her just 15 years old. 15. to men who raped her and beat her and burned her with irons. and finally after years with the help of a non-profit led by other survivors, she found the courage to break free and get the services she needed. sheila earned her ged, today she is a powerful, fierce advocate who helped to pass a new anti-trafficking law right here in new york. [ applause ] . >> these women endured unspeakable horror, but in their unbreakable will, in their courage, in their resilience, they remind us that this cycle can be broken. victims can become not only survivors, they can become leaders and vad owe cats and bring about change. and i just met eman, sheila and their fellow advocates and they are an incredible inspiration. they are here, they've chosen to tell their stories. i want them to stand and be recognized because they are inspiring all of us. please. sheila, ima. [ applause ] to ema and sheila and each of
. but they are fighting back. we'll talk with sheila bair, former chairwoman of the fdic. you're watching cbs "this morning saturday". i love my extrabucks rewards, and right now, they're doubling! so, when i shop -- i earn twice as much with double extrabucks rewards. that's two times the rewards! yeah, that's what double is. i know. i was agreeing with you. it's two times. act fast and sign up at cvs.com/doublebucks for double quarterly extrabucks rewards. don't miss getting double quarterly extrabucks rewards. i love 'em! hgotta start the day off right. wardrobe. cute. then new activia breakfast blend. a great way to help start the day. mmm... creamy lowfat yogurt with grains in yummy breakfast flavors, like apple cinnamon. its hearty, with twice the protein of regular lowfat yogurt and helps regulate your digestive system. our morning routines are important, aren't they? new activia breakfast blend. the not so pretty truth about their body washes. i wouldn't change. [ female announcer ] this test paper was designed to react like your skin. if other body washes can strip this paper, imagine how
later in the program we're going to be speaking with sheila bair the former fdic chairman. she was running the fdic at the time. they come in and clean up the banks after they go one. we know those four years, in the span of two years after that the financial crisis unfolded, many banks, lehman brothers, bear stearns, merrill lynch these household names, gone. >> you guys both economic reporters. do you remember what you were doing that day? >> somewhat blurred. i never experienced such an incredible sort of wave of stuff. you're working on five different stories at the same time because it was one thing after another. like when you're in the ocean and the waves keep coming. that's the way it felt like. it was relentless. >> every time i would get a phone call or a look down at my blackberry i was nevus because the emails coming in were constantly -- it was a barrage of negative news and you never knew what to look for next. i remember the bear stearns e-mail that sunday night when it turned out bear stearns was going under getting bought out for $2. i was working for cnbc at t
. wayne: thank you very much. and you are? - sheila. wayne: nice to meet you, sheila. this is jordan, jordan, this is sheila. - hi, jordan, nice to meet you! wayne: you're going to play a little game called dice duel. in dice duel, we have over $15,000 up for grabs. on that stage right there where tiffany coyne is standing we have little cards. behind each of those cards there's cash. when you roll a number, you get the cash behind that number. but if you roll a number that's already been rolled, you lose all your money and the other person wins the game. that's why it's called dice duel. to help you out, i'm giving each one of you a free roll card. you see that at home? if you roll a bad number, you can use this card to immediately roll again and stay in the game. to see who goes first, you're each going to roll one die. whoever has the highest number, then you go first. so i picked you first, jordan, so you roll to roll, roll to roll. a three. okay. jordan rolled a three. go ahead. she rolled a six. you've got first go. mr. mangum, may i please have that? all right, here we go. rol
here at 6:3 a.m. heern. plus we have sheila bair. she has lessons to tell. and we've got tpg founder and ceo, he says now is the time to own financials. plus he'll talk about report that's took an enormous losses due to jpmorgan's london whale. so a busy morning ahead of us, but first let's talk about the big headlines starting with the markets. sharp gains last week to end multiyear highs. the s&p and nasdaq posting their best weeks in three months. and the rally was all ten finished in the black. and bp reportedly talks to sell some of its gulf of mexico oilfields to explain xs floor race and production for about $7 billion. uk energy qui aunt wants to raise money it pay for damages from the 2010 oil spill. >>> and treasury announcing it will sell most of its stake in aig, the move will make the government a minority investor for the very first time since rescued the company can during the financial crisis four years ago. treasury was expected to sell stock this month, but analysts say the makingfully tud of the planned 18 month offering is a surprise and as joe was mentt before, q
over an old 401(k). so who's in control now, mayans? >> eliot: coming up, congresswoman sheila jackson lee on the non-existent problem of voter fraud. but first obama gets a key endorsement, fox news anchors get in an argument, and when it doesn't fit anywhere else, we put it in the viewfinder. . >> an electrifying endorsement of obama. >> you need to give obama four more years. [ bleep ] bush got eight years. clintclinton. [ bleep ] had eight years. you didn't give him a clean house. the tv didn't work. >> could that endorsement mean a win for president obama. >> i think it will be a world of good for barack obama with this endorsement. >> how about reacting that the memos that went forward from the embassy while riots were taking place. >> most of the news media out in washington and the campaign trail focused on mitt romney and his comments rather than the substance of the comments. >> why are we worrying about a memo that was sent out from the country. >> yeah, but they're asking the question, not mitt romney. >> he was holding it about the memo. >> but the reporters could
the pickup trucks to the curb. >>> she was unhurt. what a terrible experience. >>> 52 year-old sheila hicks% aboard but was killed at the scene. the president daughter was critically injured. >>> the 16 complex fire is burning near highway 16. it is numbered about 18,000 a.. hellfire says yesterday firefighters or to control potpie lines and highways 16 has now we opened. the had the virus outbreak is not keeping people away from yosemite national park. he just a couple days after officials said as many as 22 dozen visitors may have been exposed to the road and bone disease. this this is weekend says the confident that the city has taken the proper measures to keep him sick. >>> to close those cavan's down. and then day help the party tent in include all these cabins. >>> shut down after two months were found infesting the double walls of the structures. do people have died from the virus already. >>> we restore $4 million. for best buddies. how he curtly 40 degrees is set for rose the and it's 54 degrees and san jose. today will pan out will be aware of the day than yesterday. average had
. eliot spitzer what do you have for us on "viewpoint." >> we have sheila bear who's blockbuster book is really turning heads. not a pretty picture for a lot of the wall street executives. tim geithner really takes it on the chin. fascinating book. she will be here. and then shari blare, absolutely charming. great lawyer former judge, running a foundation that does great stuff for women around the world. fun interesting conversation. >> sheila bear is one of the heros that did the right thing. >> indeed she do. >> cenk: looking forward to it elliot, thank you. >> thank you. >> cenk: when we come back we're going to do are they contagious? i don't think so. [ male announcer ] contract the rainbow! taste the rainbow! >> cenk: we no climate change has had devastating results, but this one might hit home. we're going to lose 10% production in europe and 1.3% reduction in u.s. of our bacon. our bacon. climate change! don't do it to him! oh, there it is! the oil companies ruining our bacon! and oil subsidies are always involved, but poor harvest is a huge part of the reaso
the sheila behar and we spent about ten minutes on that. it's really good to know all that stuff is what i'm saying. i need to appreciate and get interested in it, right? i do. i'm trying. germany's highest court ruling that the country can ratify the new permanent european bailout funds. where is she? she's not in frankfurt. she's not in front of the ugly sign. what is that behind you this time? anyway, good morning, silvia. where are you? >> we are outside the temporary building of the german constitutional court. the second senate, the constitutional court ruled today, that a temporary injunction that stopped the german president from signing the treaty that had already been passed. they stopped this temporary injunction that a number of complainants had asked for. the german president can now sign the esm treaty and the esm can go ahead as planned. but, of course, it's never quite so simple. the devil is in the detail. the constitutional court also said they allow the esm, as it were at this stage, provided the $190 billion euros that germany signs up for as liability are really the li
.. á take pkgácghd intv2 unemployment rate drops downtown columbus since spring.. sheila black has been unemployed.take sot 12:45:27- &p36runs=9ácghd intv2 sheila black/unemployedjoe stoll and sheila black: "what's it ike for a person? you know, it's reallyydevestating. i haveea seventeen year old son, and i mean even being on unemployment, that's just not enough money." so.. she's hitting the computers here at co-wic.. a one stop employment service center.. trying to fiid a permanent gig.take sot "over the ppst couple of years, its been up and ddwn up and down, laid off, going back, working temporary." are things getting any better? the august unemployment rate cameeout down slightly from eight point three percent to eight point one. the report says employment rose by 96- thousand...but therr were still twelve and a half million people uuemployed. but how critical are all these numbers?take sot 12:57:28-32runs=4ácghd intv2 suzanne collman-tolbertcowic presidentsuzanne collman- tolbert: "we're not really focusing that much on the numbers. we use them as a
? she is with sfmta. then we have maria cordero. and sheila evans. are they here? they are representing the sfmta. next up, harbaugh alan kelly, jr., batting for the p.u.c. commission. following him, we have edgar lopez, future building manager in construction design. thank you. tiffany, i don't see her. she may be joining us later. she is the newly a.ed director of the san francisco redevelopment agency. for those who don't know her, she has a very intimate understanding of the portfolio that the redevelopment agency has been managing. >> jeff newmeyer. did i say that correctly? >> good. >> he is with the san francisco international airport. next up we have barbara smith -- no, we actually have domenica henderson from the san francisco housing authority, one of our community leaders. we have rhonda simmons, who heads up the office of work force development. rhonda, give a wave to the people. thank you. do we have a representative from america's cup? the port authority, the port? [inaudible] maybe they will be joining us a little bit later. so, i think, if i am not mistaken, we are goin
in suburban atlanta. paul and sheila comber kept their son mitch confined and malnourished for four years and then on his 18th birthday shipped him to los angeles with a list of homeless shelters. authorities found him there and mitch is now back in georgia in safe surroundings and his parents are in custody. >> number five on a list of things never to do, this would be near the top. a man believed to be in his 20s jumped from the monorail at the bronx zoo and into a tiger pit. he's in critical condition after suffering puncture wounds but he's alive. that's the good news. staff used a fire extinguisher to keep the tiger at bay and the jumper then rolled under a hot wire to safety. wow. >> money can soon be on the way to the victims of the theaters victims in aurora, colorado. a special master has been appointed to distribute money to the families of those who lost their lives and the 58 wounded in that attack. feinberg comes to the project with specialized experience. he's also been hired by penn state who help claims by victims. ken feinberg joins me this morning. >> good morning. >> wh
landfill. sheila davis is with a silicon valley toxics coalition. >>> if it is cheaper were easier. it goes to landfills. >>> like ccs refining in stockton. >>> this comes along along at an inopportune time because people will have an opportunity to put things in a landfill as opposed to shipping it to us for cycling. >>> that he is not convinced the technology is ready as. >>> we're not going to approve someone recycling unless we know that it is safe and effective. and willingly they want their products to cycled so i think that the state owes it to the people of california to make sure that is recycled properly. >>> the state's department of toxic substance control does not regulate recycling trees. they tell us despite the rule change the fee structure will stay the same but they admit they're bracing for a lot of complaints. >>> probably one of the luckiest people in the world at the moment. >>> it's an avalanche swept him away. the bay area's ski lead- in's talks about the moment when you had to stop looking for his friends and focus on surviving. >>> everything you t
. sheila johnson an entrepreneur. linda gooden the officer of lockheed martin and the highest ranking african-american executive there. we're going to be honoring sharon pender a small business advocate. as well as expert and we're also going to be honoring hometown favorite natalie randolph who's the coach of calvin coolidge high school. the senior high school men's football team. >> isn't that amazing? these women are incredible. i'm telling, i have to thank you because i don't feel like i belong in that group. these are incredible outstanding -- i mean sheros. women who have really blazed a trail. i want to let everybody know because it is at the carlisle suites, 1731 new hampshire avenue and it begins at 1:30 on sunday, september 16th. it's going to be a fabulous brunch. >> yes. tickets are available at www.womenatliberty.com. >> and i'm going to put it on my website. jchayward.com. so if you go to my website, jchayward.com, you'll be able to get tickets for this special event. you know what? bring your daughters. bring your nieces. bring your grandchildren. so that they can see t
that could really help the housing market more quickly. >> can we get your reaction to sheila bear's new book? >> i was able to work with her very closely. whether it is working on the settlement or in a number of other areas, and the work that she did on loan modifications was something that we looked at closely. when you're setting up our program. when she speaks, i always listen. she has a lot to contribute. i also think that more and more as we look back what we're seeing is that many of the decisions that we made have actually really began to make a difference in the housing market and for families, whether it is the 5.5 million families, the millions of families who have been able to refinance because of the work we have done. all of those things have contributed to the recovery we are seeing, whether it is home prices. i encouraged as the history is more written, what you will see is the steps that we have taken in the housing market have really made a difference. >> the obama administration is taking credit for the price in housing? >> i think there is no question that the actions we
next time for a conversation with former fdic chair sheila bair. we'll talk about our efforts to regulate wall street. that is next time. we will see you then. >> there is a saying that dr. king had that said there is always the right time to do the right thing. i try to live my life every day by doing the right thing. we know that we are only halfway to completely eliminating hunger and we have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> be more.
next week, sheila behr. keep it here where wall street meets main street. i will see you next weekend.
for being with me. my guest next week, sheila behr. keep it here where wall street meets main street. i will see you next weekend. that fridge in your kitchen may have crossed this bridge. your new car probably rode these rails. that shipment you just received was tracked by satellite. we build and maintain. we invest and innovate. so we can deliver what america needs. this year alone, freight rail companies plan to spend twenty-three billion of their own money, not taxpayer dollars, to build bridges, maintain track, and develop new technologies to ep freight rail and our economy moving. there's a lot riding on these rails.
in on the action. joining us now is representative sheila jackson lee democrat from texas and a member of the congressional black caucus who led a huge and historic voting drive in houston today. congresswoman, thank you so much for joining us tonight. >> thank you it's great to be with you. it is great to be a supporter of everyone's right to vote. >> eliot: that is something that we believe in, i was led to believe. i had thought that was part of the fabric of our society. until this past year when all of these voter i.d. laws started floating around. but before we get to that, tell us about today in houston. why today, how successful was it and the energy you felt out there in this effort. >> it was exciting. we just left a group of enthusiastic ladies who were out on the street corners until the last hours to make sure drivers knew that they could come and vote. you know we're a state that suffered 300,000 that were burned from the voting rolls -- purged from the voting rolls between 2008 and 2010. we're now being thre
, and she now has a stable job, and she is an advocate. she has testified before congress. or ask sheila white, who grew up in the bronx, fleeing an abusive home. a man sold her when she was 15 years old. men raped her. finally, after years with the help of a non-profit led by other survivors, she found the courage to break free and get the services she needed. sheila earned her ged. she helped pass an anti- trafficking law here in new york. these women endured unspeakable horror, but in their unbreakable will, in their courage, in their resilience, they remind us the cycle can be broken. victims can become not only survivors, but leaders and advocates and bring about change. i just met some of these women and their advocates, and i have to tell you they are an incredible inspiration. they are here, they have chosen to tell their stories, and i want them to stand and be recognized because they are inspiring all of us. please. [applause] to each of you, in the darkest hours of your lives, you may have felt utterly alone and it seemed like nobody cared. and the important thing for us to un
you. wayne: and you are? -sheila. -mike. wayne: a pleasure to meet the three of you, welcome. now, mike, is this a costume or are you actually active duty? -i'm actually active duty. wayne: thank you so much. let's hear it for michael. (cheers and applause) thank you for serving, sir. what do you do, miss sheila? -i'm a fourth grade teacher. wayne: i love teachers. -i'm a teacher too, and a drama teacher. wayne: i love drama teachers, i love drama teachers. and rebecca, what about you? -i'm a high school teacher. i'm just starting in two weeks. wayne: just starting in two weeks? thank you. so we have some knowledge, we have some courage. i love this. now we're going to let you make deals. you will all be making deals, but not for yourselves. in fact, you will learn, like you teach your kids, we're going to learn teamwork right now. each person's deal will be made by the other two people. so rebecca, stand over here for me, this is your deal. sheila, michael, tell me, should rebecca take what's in my pocket? should she take $800? or the small box? rebecca, that's jonathan, jonathan
congressional candidates and senate candidates are doing poorly. right now i'm joined by sheila bair, author of "bull by the horns fighting to save main street from wall street and wall street from itself." . she's worked as research and director council to republican bob dole. great to have you here. joe weisenthal, deputy editor at business insider. msnbc joy reid at our sister website thegrio.com. and josh barro. it was 90 billion views? >> we're pushing 100 billion. >> paid views, yes. >> i'm going to retire. >> that's right. off the royalties from that. if only. if only every writer in america -- >> isn't that how it works? >> isn't that how it works? i found the polling stuff to be kind of remarkable this week. you know, the polling i think, look, let's not overstate how accurate polls are. there's margins of error and it's also possible that we are systematically getting something wrong. there were models in the big wall street banks tharp systematically miss pricing real estate. i think if you're empirically minded and look at the data, the president is winning the race. his lead has
. >> we know he'll be there later this week, that for issusure. and joining me no is sheila jackson lee of texas' 18th district. great to have you here. the president's victory there in '08, it was historic. first time since jimmy carter we saw north carolina go from red to blue, but this light of the job's jobless rating including 19% black unemployment, almost double the state's overall unemployment figure are african-american voters less enthusiastic this time around and with good reason? >> it's good to be with you. and i'm delighted to represent the democratic party. president obama, which is the american all-inclusive party. african-americans are part of that inclusiveness. they are part of the thinking voters that understand that america is moving forward. so our voters will recognize the hardships that we are trying to overcome. frankly, however, tleel liz that the equality and social opportunities are premiere to improving their economic opportunities. and i might just say that not only the spirit, but the sacrifice of dr. martin luther king is well embeddeded in african-americ
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 112 (some duplicates have been removed)